Yarby Pens

Yarby Pens
Yarby Pens

The art of autography or the act of writing something by hand has a long history. Ancient Sumerians and Babylonians developed the first writing stylus which was made of metal, bone, or ivory.  Introduced around 700 AD was the feather quill utilizing pigment and feathers from the goose, raven, or swan. Feathers turned into fountain pens sometime during the 19th century, and then the ball point was invented.

Whether a writer be scribbler, printer, or with a preference for script, each seeks the perfect tool.  Yarby Pens, a father/son operation first began as a hobby.  A friend of Jason Yarborough’’s dad, Jimmy Yarborough, made pens and gave him one. Jimmy looked at it and said, “I want to do that.” Retired and already into woodworking, Jason’s dad made his first pen.  A few months later he bought a lathe and proceeded to make pens for the family.

It wasn’’t long before Jason decided he wanted to learn how to make pens too. “My dad and I are super close.  It’s something we enjoy, so when I go home we make pens. We love working together creating beautiful gifts, and Dad can make anything.”  The process of pen-making is tedious and has many layers, such as slicing, inserting, gluing, spinning, trimming, and coupling where the wood meets.  It takes anywhere from 30 to 75 minutes to make a Yarby pen. Yarby Pens produces three different styles: classic slim line, classic twist, and Big Ben.  Prices vary anywhere from $45-$125, but the pens are worth every penny.

Jason Yarby holding one of his gorgeous pens.
Jason Yarby holding one of his gorgeous pens.

Jason is a storyteller who also has a website called The Wild Letters (www.thewildletters.com).  “When I tell a story on The Wild Letters, I name them all (the pens).  This one, I call Canterbury.  That’s the one I carry on a regular basis.  For each pen I tell stories with, I base them on where I’m going, what I’’ve seen, what I’’ve done, what matters, and the influential experience of the trip.”   
While writing The Wild Letters, “I take random adventures.  [During these  adventures]  I’m basically a nomad who tells stories about the people I meet and my experiences [through words, photography, and music]. What better way to tell a story than with a pen!